Event Transcripts
TRANSCRIPT: Andy Murray 10 October 2012
Shanghai Rolex Masters - October 10, 2012
Shanghai Rolex Masters
Shanghai Rolex Masters
An interview with:
ANDY MURRAY


Q.  When did you first find out that Florian wasn't going to be able to play? 
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I went to the gym this morning in the hotel, and he was in the gym at the same time.  Yeah, I didn't know until 15, 20 minutes ago.  Just finished practicing, and then we got told. 

Q.  A good thing?  Would you have preferred to play today?  Will you practice again?
ANDY MURRAY:  I'll practice again.  I mean, you never know whether it's a good or a bad thing.  I mean, you're obviously prepared to play the match. 
Yeah, sometimes it happens when you get a walkover.  You just need to make sure you do enough practice and stay sharp.  You know, hopefully I come out playing well tomorrow. 
When you haven't played that much on the court, it's different conditions.  Whoever I play now I guess will have played two matches.  Might take a little while for me to adjust tomorrow.  Need to make sure I'm patient. 

Q.  Will you be watching your next opponents at all, their match?
ANDY MURRAY:  I don't even know when they're on.  I'm going to practice again when I'm done here, try and get on center court when the Djokovic match has finished.  Then, yeah, probably try to get out of here as soon as I'm done. 

Q.  You're a young guy and have had a lot of success.  Compared to Roger Federer, you're relatively new to this.  Are you amazed by the fact that he still has so much desire, wants to hang in there, that he does so well at 31?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, to me it's his performances throughout the whole year.  It's his consistency that's been the most impressive thing. 
Guys have had a lot of success and played well.  Someone like Agassi played very well deep into his 30s.  But to have the consistency that's Roger's had pretty much throughout every year and be right at the top of the game for so long, that's something that's not been done before really. 
Well, I hope that's the case with some of the guys just now.  I hope when I'm 31 I still, you know, have a lot of desire and still am trying to compete at the highest level. 
It's such a hard thing to do.  He's been doing it now getting close to 10 years.  That's very impressive in a sport as physical as this one to have done that. 

Q.  You spoke about relief yesterday after winning the US Open.  How have you changed as a person?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I hope not.  Yeah, I mean, it's obviously not really for me to answer.  I mean, I hope everything's kind of stayed the same away from the tennis court.  I haven't changed my friends or family or the team of people that I work with at all.  Still have the same relationship with all of them. 
Yeah, I just hope that when I'm on the court I'll play a little bit freer maybe than in the past, will have a little bit more confidence in myself in certain moments in big matches.  That's what I would hope I would gain from the US Open. 

Q.  There's all this talk about maybe Sir Andy Murray or you'll be on the OBE list.  Does that have any meaning to you?  Not so important in the scheme of things?
ANDY MURRAY:  I mean, it's not something I think about when I'm training and stuff.  That isn't something that necessarily drives me.  But it is obviously a massive acknowledgment of what someone's done in their given field through their career. 
I mean, like you said, I've had a very short career so far.  I still hopefully have a lot of years left on the tour.  So I'm sure something like that can wait.  I don't think what I've done just now would justify something like that.  But if I can hopefully keep what I've been doing the last few years up for five, six more years, then possibly.  But I don't think just now is probably the right time for that. 

Q.  Has anything surprised you about the reaction or the response to your US Open win?
ANDY MURRAY:  Uhm, I don't know.  It's kind of hard to say.  It's something that maybe I built up so much in my head.  I'd spoken in the past, you know, it's something that worried me a little bit, if I was to win a Grand Slam if it would change how my life was away from the court, if it would become much busier and harder. 
I spoke to Ivan about that as well earlier on in the year.  He told me it doesn't change that much; only positive things happen after it.  That's been the case so far.  Didn't change much for me, like I said. 
You know, once I got back to training, did all the commitments afterwards, I just got back to playing tennis and doing what I enjoyed. 
It's given me a good sort of motivation to go on and keep working hard and hopefully win another one, if I can. 

Q.  Last weekend you were coming in from Tokyo, so I'm not sure whether you got here in time.  Roger was seeing all the powers that be, Wimbledon people were here, Tim was here.  Did you get involved in those talks or did you arrive too late?
ANDY MURRAY:  Arrived late.  I saw Tim, the guys from Wimbledon, chatted to them briefly.  I also spoke to Craig Tiley, as well, from the Australian Open just briefly.  I bumped into them, asked them how the meetings had gone and stuff.  I obviously spoke to the players as well. 
It sounds like, you know, they went pretty well, which is good.  Yeah, I didn't speak to anybody before the meetings, and I wasn't involved in any of them 'cause I got here the day after. 

Q.  So from your perspective it's all steam ahead now, the Australian Open is on, everything is fine, all those threats have gone away now?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I hope so.  I think the Australian Open has stepped up really well.  They've obviously listened to the players and the ATP and have made a real effort to improve things. 
You know, from my side, I never viewed striking at the Australian Open as a real option.  From all the players I've spoken to so far, everyone's been very happy with the increases in the prize money and their plan over the next few years, as well.  Hopefully that's something we won't need to worry about for a while. 

Q.  There's a couple more big events before the end of the season.  Talk about your level of freshness and motivation at this stage. 
ANDY MURRAY:  Motivation's pretty high just now.  Freshness could be better.  It's not the same probably as it was at the beginning of the year.  You seem to pick up a few more niggles here and there.  I got sick in Tokyo last week.  Hadn't been sick the whole year.  Probably your immune system is slightly as well.  There are a few things you pick up week to week. 
But motivation for me is high.  Like I say, I feel relaxed, maybe less pressure.  I'm excited to be on the court.  I'm enjoying practicing and enjoying playing the matches, so I'll try and finish the year well.

Q.  In terms of winning another one, obviously there are different kinds of hard courts.  Is the Australian Open as suitable for you as the US Open proved to be in terms of conditions?
ANDY MURRAY:  I actually prefer the court at the Australian Open, the balls as well.  I think that surface is probably a little bit better for me.  I feel I played some of my best tennis there over the last few years. 
I love the center court there.  I like the conditions on it.  Yeah, it's a good court for me. 
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